READING

Ending Symbols of Hate and Oppression in the Unite...

Ending Symbols of Hate and Oppression in the United States

Earlier this month, Nash Farm Battlefield of Hampton Georgia closed its doors for good. The decision came after a local county commissioner, Dee Clemmons, demanded all Confederate flags be removed from the premises. Nash Farm was the site of a Civil War battle which occurred in August of 1864. A Confederate victory was the outcome of this battle, which is an injustice in itself. The museum claims it showed the conflict from both sides in a balanced manner. Local schools and JROTC groups would joyfully come and visit to be fully indoctrinated with what is, obviously, southern racist vile.

Luckily Clemmons was in office solely to prevent further damage to the young and impressionable, such as myself. Although having never actually visited the museum, her decision was undoubtedly reasonable “there has been an overwhelming request from my constituents to remove the Confederate Flag at the county-owned Nash Farm Park. I was surprised that we have this flag in our county inventory flying high for almost 8 years. When I investigated further with Tim Coley I was relieved that the flag did not belong to Henry County.” She did not intend for Nash Farm to be shut down but found it reasonable to believe they could stay open and tell the same story without the presence of any Confederate flags. But that’s not what a supporter of the battlefield, Stuart Carter, conveyed

“Sure I understand some people find the imaging of (the Confederacy) offensive,” he said. “But if we try and erase it from history, then we can’t remember how we messed up and why we shouldn’t go back there again.” Spoken like a true bigot.

This way of effectively resolving social conflict has now become a flashy trend. New Orleans removed the last of its Confederate monuments last month, creating a safe and welcoming environment to all those persecuted under the Confederate army. But why stop here? The United States is full of symbols of hate and oppression which have no place in our progressive society. One of which is located in New Orleans.

The Museum of Death prides itself on the displays of painfully triggering serial killer artwork and gruesome imagery of real-life horrendous acts. A conscious effort is made by the owner to praise and seek out artifacts of serial killers and create a space of discomfort and fear. Many people (by this, I mean some friends and I) have requested the removal of this horrific site with no avail. Its presence brings a dark damper on my daily life, even though I’ve never actually set foot in it.

This country has done so much wrong, and yet we allow people to take pride in it. That should also end. The Fourth of July is a day of demonic praise where white folks all around celebrate the day we claimed independence and freedom for straight white men (and only straight white men). It celebrates the day we founded a country that almost brought Native Americans to extinction. A country built on the backs of slaves. A country that put Japanese-Americans into camps over suspicion of treason. Yet we still believe the sale of fireworks and hot dogs, all that is American, is acceptable.

If you aren’t completely convinced by now that symbols of hate rule this country, consider this. During World War II the Nazis created a blueprint of a rocket to be sent into earth’s orbit. This is similar technology to what we used just a few years later to land on the moon. To this day we are still using a technology first thought of by Nazis! Space exploration may seem cool to some, but when you consider the hate behind it and the emotional toll it must have on the Jewish-Americans who proudly flew into space on the backs of this technology, it loses the glamor.

All of these oppressive symbols and monuments that we just blindly allow should be a call for action. If we all step up and do our part to call out these infringements on our pursuit of happiness, we will one day have a peaceful country where everyone is equal and everyone gets along. Maybe the best way to start is by giving handicaps to people with abilities that exceed that of the average human. Or we could each make a personal effort to seek out oppressive books and burn them. Books have no use nowadays, anyway. Whatever the answer is, we can no longer stand around and allow such symbols to exist in what is supposed to be “the land of the free”.


Abby Brookshire is pursuing a chemistry degree at UT Arlington. When she's not playing video games from her childhood she's writing articles and wondering onto farms to pet cows. She is the self designated most fabulous member of Refined Right. Abby loves to meet new people, especially those who disagree with her politics and/or supply free sushi.

COMMENTS ARE OFF THIS POST